My Wet Shave Method

I thought I would document my method of wet shaving, everyone’s seems to be different. It’s probably worth saying that I only wet shave every other day (although I’ve started on Saturdays as well), with an electric razor shave in between.

So here’s how I shave:

  1. Fill sink with warm water
  2. Soak brush in sink while filling (and shaving soap if I’m using a soap)
  3. Wet face with warm water
  4. Build lather (if on face, if in mug, do before wetting face)
  5. Shave with the grain (straight down my face, WTG)
  6. Re-lather from quantity generated previously
  7. Shave against the grain (ATG)
  8. Run my hand over my face and touch up any rough areas
  9. Rinse with cold water
  10. Have a shower
  11. (A while later I apply some aftershave balm)

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Why Our Homes Remain Dumb

Jacob Kastrenakes has a piece over at The Verge called The Dumb State of the Smart Home. It talks about how current ‘smart’ devices aren’t capable of interconnectivity, largely because they don’t talk the same language.

I know a bit about this subject, because I put together some basic home automation myself. Nothing too fancy, mine just controls a lamp, on a timer. Mine’s a bit smarter than the units you plug into the wall because it changes based on sunset as to when it comes on in the evening, and only comes on if sunrise is after a certain time (i.e. it’s dark enough for me to need light) in the mornings.

To do it, I use a standard set of remote control plug sockets, and a USB dongle from a company called Telldus. I use the bottom of their range, which only talks one-way, it doesn’t receive data back. My application, as I said, is very basic.

The Internet of Things seems to have become a growing buzz-phrase this year, after talk of it forever. If it sounds like it’s on the verge of breaking into the mainstream, I can tell you now, it won’t.

Interoperability is certainly one reason. You see, my dongle transmits on 433.92 MHz. As you can see, that makes it compatible with a range of protocols, including X10, the grandfather of them all, having been around since 1975. Z-Wave and ZigBee use 868 Mhz (in Europe), which is another popular frequency. Continue reading

De-Icing with Warm Water

A frozen windscreen

When I tell most people that I don’t scrape my windscreen, I pour warm water on it, they look at me aghast. The old adage about it cracking screens is frequently mentioned. I’d like to set that straight.

I’ve used warm water on all of my cars, every winter for the better part of 20 years. Not once has it caused a screen to crack, not once has it caused a chip to expand.

I think this is a leftover from the days when windscreens were made solely of glass. In modern cars (any made in the last 20 years) they’re a composite, with layers of plastic and glass. It’s the plastic that stops the thing shattering (which I’ve seen an old screen do), and the mixture makes them much tougher.

There are some caveats, of course, I would recommend that you DON’T USE BOILING WATER. I think your screen could take it, but you don’t need it. I use water from the hot tap, which is more like 40 degrees (Celsius). Continue reading

Safety Razor Costs

I touched on this briefly in my previous post, but I thought I would break it out into more detail. One of the reasons safety razors are gaining in popularity is cost. As Mike Levine from Dollar Shave Club says in his video: “Do you like spending $20 a month on brand name razors? $19 go to Roger Federer.”

Using a cartridge shaving system, even a middle-of-the-road one, probably cost me £20-26 a year, plus £5 if I was to buy the razor. Not exactly a massive amount, but then I probably only bought 8-12 cartridges a year, plus a couple of cans of gel. I managed this, in part, because I used my cartridges well beyond the recommended length.

Those prices are derived from my local supermarket’s website. They don’t have a safety razor listed, but let’s call that £5. They have a 10-pack of Personna blades for £1.89, a shaving brush for £3.20 and a shave stick for 49p. So the blades and soap come in way under the equivalent cartridge costs, even if you add the brush it’s still cheaper. Continue reading

My Safety Razor Experience

A while back, I wrote about Wet Shave Economics, the costs of wet shaving. I’ve been interested in trying a safety razor for a while, so stuck it on my wishlist for Christmas, and Santa delivered. I haven’t been using my razor very long, but I thought I would throw down my initial impressions and experience.

The Equipment

I was a very lucky boy, and Father Christmas furnished me with:

  • An Edwin Jagger DE89L razor
  • A dish of Mitchell’s Wool Fat Shaving Soap
  • An Edwin Jagger Best Badger brush
  • A pack of Derby Extra blades
  • A pack of Feather blades
  • A brush and razor stand
  • An Osma block of Alum

As I said, I was very lucky.

The Costs

As with everything, you can spend as much or as little as you want. I was lucky to receive some top-quality items, but you could buy everything you need for under £20. Equally, you could spend £100 on a brush alone (or more), £20 (or more) on single shaving soap and that’s before the pre-shave treatments, the post-shave balms and colognes, or any other nice-to-have equipment.

On the other hand, you can pick up something like a Wilkinson Sword Classic for under £5 (with blades), a brush for under £10 and a shaving stick for as little as 49 pence (that’s what my Palmolive Shave Stick cost me in my local supermarket). Continue reading